Answered By: Julie Rustad
Last Updated: Oct 18, 2018     Views: 27030

The answer to your question is it depends. If you are citing multiple articles within the same paragraph, then you need to include an in-text or parenthetical citation for every idea or thought even if each article is referred to multiple times within the same paragraph. The reason why is to reduce confusion by the reader for determining what author(s) had which idea.

If you are citing only one study within the same paragraph multiple times, then you can alternate between a parenthetical citation and an in-text citation to aid in the flow and readability of your paper for the reader. You may also use language that continues to point out to the reader additional thoughts or ideas that came from the same previously cited study. Using personal pronouns, if you know the author's gender, and other third person language, such as "the author also found...", "the researcher continued....", "he or she informed....", "they strongly advised....", etc. should be enough to let the reader know where the information was orginially coming from.

Here are two different examples that were offered on the APA Blog:

Ashleyallen54 (2011) provides us with one example using a mix of in-text and parenthetical citations:

Viglione (2010) argues that the cross-pollination and fusion of musical genres over the last two decades has exposed children to a diversity of musical styles. Technology has also made possible the distribution and sharing of music in exciting new ways (Viglione, 2010). According to Viglione, "Music is shared through social media sites, analyzed and tailored for the individual listener via sites like Pandora, and simply given away by musicians on their websites" (p. 20). As a result, in the future, children will likely develop eclectic musical tastes early and expect a diversity of musical styles at younger and younger ages (Viglione, 2010).

AND

Whereas, SA (2011) chooses to cite the author in an in-text citation followed by other language to point to the previously cited study:

Viglione (2010) suggests that cross-pollination and fusion of musical genres over the last 2 decades has exposed children to a diversity of musical styles. He points out that technology has also made possible the distribution and sharing of music in exciting new ways. Music is shared through social media sites, analyzed and tailored for the individual listener via sites like Pandora, and simply given away by musicians on their websites. As a result, he argues, in the future, children will likely develop eclectic musical tastes early and expect a diversity of musical styles at younger and younger ages.

One word of caution, be sure to be clear in your language choice to avoid confusion on the part of the reader. Also, once you begin a new paragraph, you must clearly identify and include a new in-text or parenthetical citation.

Remember, the main goal is to point out and differenitate to the reader your thoughts, words, and ideas versus those of someone else.

References:

Ashleyallen54. (2011, March 23). Re: Citing paraphrased work in APA style [Blog comment]. Retrieved from http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/03/citing-paraphrased-work-in-apa-style.html

SA. (2011, March 23). Re: Citing paraphrased work in APA style [Blog comment]. Retrieved from http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/03/citing-paraphrased-work-in-apa-style.html

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